Why I’m Marching: Migrant and marginalised experiences

As we do every year, we’ve been asking you to tell us why you are marching in this year’s March for Choice. Thanks to all who have sent us your thoughts. In this post, Jane reflects on the experiences of marginalised people in Ireland who are disproportionately affected by the Eighth Amendment and lack of abortion access. If you would like to tell us why you’re marching this year, please email hello@meathforchoice.ie

“Because of their backgrounds, experiences or underlying health issues, [marginalised] women encounter more barriers to accessing health services than most Irish women.”

I am marching because women should have autonomy over their own bodies; which includes their sexual and reproductive health. I believe that access to abortion is about women’s’ rights and public health, not religious beliefs.

Repealing the 8th is important for all women who reside in Ireland but especially for women in vulnerable situations: migrants and ethnic minorities, rape survivors, women living with disabilities and women living with HIV. Because of their backgrounds, experiences or underlying health issues, these women encounter more barriers to accessing health services than most Irish women. Beyond this, they face many obstacles  to travel, especially for migrant and undocumented women.

We need to remember Savita Halappanavar, Miss Y, Bimbo Onanuga and many other migrants who expected to be treated appropriately in a country with an “advanced” economy.

– Jane, Dublin 8 via Brazil

 

Image: March for Choice 2016. Photo credit: Renee Summers